How to make the best homemade body butter with simple, natural ingredients. This DIY whipped body butter feels luxurious and delivers maximum moisture to the skin. Let me show you how to make body butter that’s non-greasy and works for any skin type.

Spooning whipped body butter into a jar
Making your own body butter is easy, you just need 2 main ingredients!

Body butters are no stranger to Live Simply. Together, we’ve made a couple of body butters before, although I didn’t call them “butters.”

First, we made this ultra-moisturizing shea butter lotion. Then we made a simple shea butter cream facial moisturizer. And, today, we’re making a silky smooth body butter for the whole body: face, arms, legs, feet…wherever you need moisture.


  • Ultra-Moisturizing: The whipped butter feels luxurious and soaks into the skin, delivering incredible moisture.
  • Easy to Make: Just melt the ingredients, chill in the fridge, then use a fork or hand-mixer to whip. That’s it! Easy and simple. I’ll guide you through each step via photos and a video.
  • Inexpensive: Body butter can cost a fortune if you buy it at the store, particularly from a natural company. Making your own body products, like body butter, is usually the cheaper route. There is an extra cost in buying the ingredients, but once you have them on hand, you can make multiple jars of your own whipped body butter (and other products).
  • Non-Toxic and Natural: Made with simple, natural ingredients. No synthetic fragrances, preservatives, or other unwanted ingredients. Just nourishing ingredients that are good for your skin.

What Readers Say

“I have never made any kind of beauty product before and this recipe made me feel like a CHAMP. Super easy to make with great results. I used mango butter, sweet almond oil as a carrier, arrowroot and lavender oil and it absorbs nicely into my skin after about 10 minutes. .”

C. Brewer

What is Body Butter?

Body butter is a rich, moisturizing skincare product that’s generally made with skincare butters, like shea butter and cocoa butter. Body butter can be used as an alternative to lotion, since its primary job is to moisturize the skin. It may be used on the entire body, from the face to the feet.

Lotion vs. Body Butter: What’s the Difference?

  • Lotion is made with water and oil (and possibly butters) so it’s light, airy, and silky smooth. Homemade lotion needs to be used within a short time or a preservative should be used (due to the water and bacterial growth). It also requires an emulsifier to properly blend the oil and water.
  • Body butter is made exclusively with butter(s) and oil(s), so it’s very thick and dense. Homemade body butter will last for up to 6 months without a preservative.

Both a body butter and lotion are used in the same way: to moisturize the skin. Body butter does deliver more moisture, since it’s not cut with water. So it’s ideal for all skin types, particularly dry skin or during the winter months.

Hands holding a glass jar with white, homemade whipped body body butter inside.
This natural product nourishes the skin with its ultra-moisturizing properties.

Ingredients Needed to Make Whipped Body Butter

DIY body butter is easy to customize to your liking. You’ll need just 2 natural ingredients. From there, you’re welcome to add 2 additional ingredients, if desired, to make a non-greasy product or add a custom scent.

  • 1/2 cup butter: shea butter, mango butter, and/or cocoa butter (I always use at least 1/4 cup shea butter)
  • 1/4 cup carrier oil: sweet almond, jojoba, grapeseed, coconut, or even olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons arrowroot flour starch (optional)
  • 36 drops favorite essential oils (optional)

The ingredients may be found online, some craft stores, or health food stores. I’ve included Amazon links in the recipe card at the bottom of this post.

Equipment Needed

  • small saucepan
  • glass or metal bowl (large enough to fit on top of the saucepan)
  • fork or hand-mixer
  • fridge
  • glass storage jar

Learn More About Each Ingredient

Shea butter bottles lined up in a row.
Butter makes up the base of any good body butter recipe.

Butter

Homemade body butter starts with a moisturizing skincare butter. Shea butter is the perfect base butter, since it’s soft and easy to work with and easy melts into your skin. My recipe calls for at least a 1/4 cup of shea butter.

From there, it’s up to you, the maker, to customize the body butter. You’ll need a total of 1/2 cup butter, so you can either double the shea (for a total of 1/2 cup shea butter), or mix the shea with a different butter: 1/4 cup of cocoa butter or 1/4 cup of mango butter.


Best Butters

  • Shea Butter: Shea butter comes from the “nut” (or pit) of the fruit found on the Karite Tree. It has a strong scent when it’s purchased in an unrefined state. I use unrefined shea butter in recipes (including body butter), but if you don’t care for the strong (natural) fragrance, use refined shea butter instead. Since shea butter is naturally soft and makes a wonderfully soft whipped body butter. It may be used on its own with a carrier oil, or combined with another butter like cocoa butter or mango butter. See all the ways you can use shea butter to make your own body products.
  • Cocoa Butter: Cocoa butter comes from cocoa beans, so it has a strong scent and smells like chocolate. Cocoa butter is hard, at room temperature, and it melts easily. Cocoa butter is naturally a very hard butter, so if you choose to use it, you need to mix it with shea butter or mango butter to make a softer body butter. See other ways to use cocoa butter to make your own body products.
  • Mango Butter: Mango butter comes from the seed of mango fruit. It’s naturally soft, similar to shea butter, and can have a gritty texture before it’s melted down. It yields a soft, airy body butter when mixed with shea butter. If you don’t want to use shea butter (due to allergies) in my recipe, then mango butter is the best replacement.
Carrier oil bottles lined up in a row.
Carrier oil choices. The carrier oil is mixed with a butter(s) to make a soft body butter that melts into the skin.

Carrier Oil

A liquid oil is the second main ingredient used to make body butter. The oils used in skincare recipes are typically referred to as carrier oils, although I usually call them nourishing oils. The oil used is completely up to you.

See all the ways to use carrier oils to make your own body products.


Best Carrier Oils

  • Sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, or grapeseed oil are best for making a non-greasy body butter that is easily absorbed by the skin. Great for all skin types.
  • Virgin coconut oil may be used, but it can be very greasy and clog pores. Avoid if you have body acne or sensitive skin.
  • Olive oil is another option; however, olive oil can be extremely heavy and feel greasy. Just like with coconut oil, this is not an option for all skin types and you may not love the results.

(Optional) Arrowroot Powder

Whipped body butter recipes can be very greasy!

The good news is that there’s a simple solution for this issue: add arrowroot flour/starch. Arrowroot is a natural starch (used in cooking to thicken soups, sauces, and stir-fry) that will absorb the greasy feel of the butters and oils, without drying out your skin.

(Optional) Essential Oils of Your Choice

An essential oil may be added for scent and additional skincare benefits. Use just one essential oil, or mix a few different essential oils to create different scents, or an essential oil blend (a pre-blended bottle of different essential oils). At the moment, my personal favorite essential oils for body butter are: lavender, geranium, and frankincense (carteri).

I use a 1% dilution in my body butter recipe. Before using any essential oil, read the back of the bottle for specific dilution recommendations.

How to Make: Step by Step Instructions & Video

Step 1: Melt the butter in a double boiler.

Partially fill a saucepan with water (about 1/4 the way full). Then place a glass (or metal) bowl on top of the saucepan.

Place the butter(s) in the glass bowl. Turn the stove-top to medium heat, placing the double boiler on top of the heat. Allow the butter(s) to fully melt (about 3-5 minutes).

Step 2: Mix arrowroot powder with carrier oil (optional).

If you’re planning to use arrowroot flour, in a small bowl, whisk the flour into the carrier oil. Set the mixture aside. If you’re not using arrowroot flour, skip this step. 

Pouring the carrier oil mixed arrowroot starch into the melted butter.

Step 3: Combine the melted butter and carrier oil.

Carefully remove the bowl (with the melted butter inside) from the double boiler set up. Add the oil (with the arrowroot flour, if using) to the melted butters, and use a spoon to stir and combine the ingredients. 

Step 4: Chill the mixture in the fridge.

At this point, the oil mixture should be cooler (along with the glass bowl). If not, allow it to rest for a few minutes. Then place the mixture in the fridge and allow it to solidify (about 30 minutes to 1 hour, depending on location in the fridge and fridge temperature). 

Step 5: Add Essential Oils (optional).

Once the mixture is opaque and a bit firm (not solid as a rock), remove the bowl from the fridge. Add the essential oil of choice, if desired. 

It’s important that the essential oils are added when the mixture is cool, as heat will cause the fragile essential oils to evaporate.

Step 6: Whip the Body Butter

If you used cocoa butter, whisk the mixture with a fork until it appears “whipped.”

If you used shea and/or mango butters, you can use the same technique with a fork, or use a hand mixer to “whip” the body butter. Just be careful not to over-whip the mixture.

Spooning whipped body butter into a jar
Spoon the mixture into a jar for storage. Store up to 6 months.

Step 7: Spoon into a Storage Jar

Scoop the mixture into a jar and place the lid on the jar. Now it’s ready to use!

Storage

Store at room temperature (out of direct sunlight) in a sealed jar for up to 6 months.

How to Use This Product In Your Skincare Routine

Use this product anytime your skin needs moisturizing. Scoop a small amount from the jar, then massage onto the skin. As you massage, the butter will melt into your skin. You only need a small amount at a time.

I love to use this product after bathing when my skin is still moist. I apply a small amount of product to my fingertips, then massage on my skin: arms, legs, feet, neck, chest.

This product may also be used on your face as a homemade shea butter moisturizer. Just avoid using coconut oil or olive oil in your formula if you plan to use it on your face. Or check out my homemade shea butter facial cream recipe.

Two glass jars of body butter on a marble board.
Use this beautiful butter on your whole body: arms, legs, feet, face, neck, and/or chest.
Spooning whipped body butter into a jar
4.84 from 60 votes

How to Make Homemade Body Butter (Non-Greasy)

This whipped body butter feels luxurious and delivers maximum moisture to the skin. Here's how to make body butter that's non-greasy and works for any skin type.
Kristin Marr
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course DIY
Cuisine Body
Servings 6 ounce jar
Cost: $4-6 per jar (depending on butter and oil used)

Equipment

  • 1 small-medium saucepan to create a double boiler and melt the butter(s)
  • 1 medium glass or metal bowl big enough to rest on top of the saucepan to create a double boiler and melt the butter(s)
  • 1 small bowl if using arrowroot starch to mix with the carrier oil
  • 1 fork or hand-mixer to whip the body butter
  • 1 glass storage jar to store the final product

Ingredients

Instructions

  • First, make a double boiler: Partially fill a saucepan with water (about 1/4 the way full). Then place a glass (or metal) bowl on top of the saucepan. Place the butter(s) in the glass bowl. Turn the stove-top to medium heat, placing the double boiler on top of the heat. Allow the butter(s) to fully melt (about 3-5 minutes).
    Adding shea butter to the glass bowl on top of a saucepan (double boiler).
  • If you're planning to use arrowroot starch/flour, in a small bowl, whisk the starch into the carrier oil of choice. Set the mixture aside. If you're not using arrowroot flour, skip this step. 
    Spooning arrowroot flour into a small bowl with carrier oil.
  • Carefully remove the glass bowl (and melted butters) from the heat source. Add the oil (with the arrowroot flour mixed in, if using), and stir to combine the ingredients. 
    Pouring the carrier oil mixed arrowroot starch into the melted butter.
  • At this point, the mixture should be cooler (along with the bowl). If not, allow it to rest for a few minutes. Then place the bowl in the fridge and allow the mixture to solidify (about 30-60 minutes, depending on location in the fridge and fridge temperature). 
  • Once the mixture is opaque and a bit firm (not solid as a rock), remove the bowl from the fridge. Add the essential oil of choice, if desired. 
    Adding essential oil to the chilled body butter mixture in a glass bowl.
  • If you used cocoa butter, whisk the mixture with a fork until it appears "whipped." If you used shea and/or mango butters, you can use the same technique with a fork, or use a hand-mixer to "whip" the mixture. Don't over-whip!
    Using a hand-mixer and beaters to whip the body butter mixture.
  • Spoon the whipped body butter into a glass storage jar with a lid. Place the lid on the jar. It's now ready to use. Store at room temperature (out of sunlight) for up to 6 months.
    Spooning whipped body butter into a jar

How to Use:

  • Use this product anytime your skin needs moisturizing. Scoop a small amount from the jar, then massage onto the skin. As you massage, the butter will melt into your skin. You only need a small amount at a time.
  • I love to use this product after bathing when my skin is still moist. I apply a small amount of product to my fingertips, then massage on my skin: arms, legs, feet, neck, chest.

Video

Notes

Which Butter Should You Use? Mango butter will yield a softer body butter, when mixed with the shea butter. Cocoa butter will yield a thicker, denser body butter that smells like chocolate, when mixed with the shea butter. Or use 100% shea butter, without mixing in other butters. Unrefined shea butter can have a strong scent, so refined shea butter may be better to use if you’re sensitive to scents.
Which carrier oil should you use? I like sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, or grapeseed oil as they work for all skin types and are light and easily absorb into the skin. Coconut oil and olive oil are also options, but they can be very heavy and clog pores.
Why use arrowroot starch? The arrowroot cuts through the greasy feel that’s often associated with body butter. It’s optional.
How much essential oil should you add? I use a 1% dilution in my recipe. Before using any essential oil, read the back of the bottle for specific dilution recommendations. This is also optional.
Tried this recipe?Let me know how it was!

SKINCARE

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173 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Hi!! I’m in love with your recipe! Haha I’ve been making it for a few weeks now, but just wondering how can I prevent it for completely melting during (really) hot days, thanks!

  2. 5 stars
    Hi Kristen!

    I make a similar recipe as a facial moisturizer that uses beeswax, but does not use any starches. It is “greasy” going on, but I let it sit on my face for about 10 minutes or so, I use that time to get my clothes out for the day and pack my lunch. Then I take a clean dry cotton washcloth and gently dab any remaining oil (if any) before I apply my make-up. I’m 57, so I use essential oils in my moisturizer, such as frankincense and lemon, that are known to help aging skin.

    I am excited about trying your body butter recipe! I do not plan to add the arrowroot but use my towel that I showered with to pat off any excess oil.

  3. Just made this recipe. Quadrupled it and substituted 1/4 of the almond oil with argan oil. Didn’t chill long enough so put in freezer and VOILA! Now that it’s done, how can I add the arrowroot after the fact? Just a little greasy, but does soak right in.

  4. 5 stars
    hi, Kristin,

    i am a beginner and am trying to create my own body butters. i have a recipe that i have substituted butters and oils to make it what i want. but i am stuck when it comes to ratio of oils to fragrance oils and also how do i turn a recipe from a small amount “say a 40z jar” to a large amount to supply “6 2.3oz smaller jars” . i have tried looking for books but cant find the right one with a good explanation.

    I really love your recipe very in-depth and detailed. and some great scents choices.

  5. 5 stars
    I have never made any kind of beauty product before and this recipe made me feel like a goddamn CHAMP. Super easy to make with great results. I used mango butter, sweet almond oil as a carrier, arrowroot and lavendar oil and it absorbs nicely into my skin after about 10 minutes. I cooled my first batch in the fridge but it took over an hour and got a little grainy. I cooled my second batch in the freezer and used a hand mixer and it turned out much smoother.

  6. 5 stars
    Hi Kristin,

    I tried your body butter using shea butter, cocoa butter, and coconut oil, and I absolutely love it! I had no idea something like this could be created at home and for a fraction of the price charged by brands. The cocoa butter actually makes this smell like chocolate, which I’m more than happy about. I added two teaspoons of arrowroot and experienced no greasiness on my skin. I found that cooling the mixture in the freezer instead of the fridge made it easier & quicker to whip. After this successful attempt, I’m going to definitely try out your lip balm next. Thank you!

  7. I am loving this and plan to make. I would also like to use this recipe and make it an immune boosting foot rub. One that has immune boosting essential oils but also feels nice on our feet as well. Any suggestions? Or do you currently use/make something similar?

  8. 5 stars
    I made mine with Shea butter and mango butter, almond oil then geranium and lemon for scent. You can still smell the shea at first but eventually the oils overpower it. Next time I will try arrowroot as it is a little more greasy than shop bought butters but it’s easy and works. Thanks for the recipe, I love it.

  9. 5 stars
    Fantastic recipe and instructions! After letting mine chill in the fridge for approximately 30 minutes and it still hadn’t hardened, I took it out and mixed it anyways. It looks like creamy white soup (and same consistency) but after leaving it for a few minutes, it hardened right up and feels wonderful to smooth on. I halved the recipe (used coconut oil as my carrier) and included arrowroot. 5 stars — thank you for sharing!

  10. Hi Kristin,

    I love your recipes and walking my way through your body care products. Your honey aloe face wash did wonders for my skin (having less luck with castile soap one) I made the body butter last night and it didn’t look as fluffy as yours. Also, the smell of arrowroot is pretty bad. I tried adding more lavender essential oil, but the strange smell is still there. Is there anything that I can do to fix the smell and fluffiness?

    Thank you.
    Sohini

    1. Hey Sohini, Hmmm, what brand of arrowroot are you using? Usually arrowroot is odorless. And what butter combo did you use? <--The butters used will determine how soft and fluffy the final butter is. The harder the butter, the firmer and more dense the body butter. In the end, the body butter won't be super fluffy in the long-term.

      1. 5 stars
        Thank you Kristin! I just used shea. I am going to get some mango butter to make it lighter. I saw that yours looked like whip cream 🙂 and wanted mine to look like that. May be the mango butter will do the trick. I used red mills arrowroot. The smell may be coming from the shea itself. Do you have any tips for anything that I can add for a different smell? I added lavender essential oil. Anything else that you can think of?

  11. Hello Kristin, I’m so happy to stumble into this recipe. I’m going to make one, but can i use avocado oil as the carrier oil? We have some in our kitchen. Tnx

  12. 5 stars
    Thank you for sharing , I ABSOLUTELY love this recipe! I used Shea and mango butter with apricot oil (I like how quickly it absorbs) and Baby’sBreath fragrance oil to scent. I used just one teaspoon of arrowroot flour and will insrease it next time although after about 30 minutes it no longer felt greasy and left my skin soft and smooth. Already planning for the next batch, going to infuse my carrier oil with chamomile and calendula flowers and use Roman chamomile EO.

  13. 5 stars
    I am wondering about the utensils – bowls, blender etc — are they easy to clean and use for other cooking or do you keep them specifically for making body butters – thanx !

    1. Hey Colleen, I recommend using hot water and a detergent-based soap that easily cuts grease (like Seventh Generation or Sal Suds). They are pretty easy to clean using these suggestions.

  14. Wonderful recipe. Question, the containers that you show in pictures with the flip suction ring lids. Where can they be purchased from.

    Thankyou for sharing

    Char

  15. Hello Kristin,

    I’m so glad to have stumbled into your blog. I started switching slowly to natural products (beauty and cleaning) since i got pregnant. My baby boy is 3 months old now. I just made your peppermint lipbalm and wants to make the body butter next but i dont have any of the carrier oils that you mentioned. Can i use olive oil or coconut oil? I will be making your foundation powder next. 🙂

    1. Hey Julai, You could definitely use coconut oil or olive oil. Olive oil will feel a bit heavy, and might be slower to absorb, but it will still work well for moisture. I’m so glad you’re enjoying the lip balm! Congrats, Mama!

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