Prep Day: 5 Ways to Prepare Eggs In Advance

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5 ways to prepare eggs in advance. Make your prep day count and prep those eggs. #5 is my favorite way.

Okay guys!

It’s that time once again for me to sing the praises of incorporating a regular prep time into your weekly schedule. If you haven’t taken the plunge and started prepping real food in advance, this is the week to do it. Why? Because this week’s prep time talk involves fluffy eggs, gooey cheese, tortillas or biscuits, and best of all…BACON!! 

I knew it. You’re in, right?!

I must know. Was it the cheese, eggs, or bacon that won your heart and tastebuds first?


Ready to end the overwhelm and simplify school lunch (as well as breakfast and dinner)?

Are you ready to take your real food lifestyle to a whole new level?

To stop thinking about what you’ll pack for lunch every morning, and become a boss parent who sends their child off with a super awesome lunch? And then easily serves nourishing food (that your family loves) for breakfast and dinner!

These strategies changed my world, and now I’m giving you the tools to change your world, too.

School Lunch

I'M READY! CLICK HERE

While most of the recipes this week’s post involve their fair portion of all three, or at least two out of the three, the real star in this week’s lesson is the egg. Yes, the humble egg.

5 ways to prepare eggs in advance

Eggs are a super easy food you can prep each week. While many of the foods we’ve talked about in this series are more of an ingredient than a full meal, eggs pretty much qualify as a one-stop meal. Eggs are a complete protein. Eggs are also inexpensive (when you think about how many eggs come in one carton) and can be prepped in large batches in advance. Basically, eggs are a mega real food WIN!

And just in case I didn’t win you over with the words bacon and inexpensive, let’s focus on three main reasons why you should think about making eggs during your prep time. After all, if you’re going to include a task on your prep day printable or mental plan, it must help maximize your time throughout the week (AKA: it better be important!) 

Why You Should Prep Eggs in Advance

1. Start the Day with Nutrients:

Eggs are the perfect food, in my opinion. Not only are eggs a healthy source of fat (eat the egg yolk!!), they are also a complete protein and loaded with essential vitamins.

2. Grab-n-Go Breakfast, Lunch, or Snack:

Eggs can be enjoyed for breakfast, lunch, or a snack. You could even include an egg theme on your dinner meal plan. This means you can take care of multiple meals and snacks just by spending a bit of time preparing eggs for the week ahead. Granted, you may not want to eat an egg burrito for both breakfast and lunch, but at least you know the option exists if you find yourself in a bind.

3. Little Experience Required:

Eggs are fairly easy to make. Yes, there’s some art and science behind cooking fluffy scrambled eggs or the perfect hardboiled egg, but for the most part eggs are pretty forgiving. If your family helps you during prep time, assembling the egg burritos or filling the deviled eggs may be the perfect way to encourage participation and maximize your time.

5 ways to prepare eggs in advance. Make your prep day count and prep those eggs. #5 is my favorite way. width=

5 Ways to Prepare Eggs in Advance

Make Ahead Freezer Breakfast Burritos

Egg Burritos: Egg Burritos are my family’s favorite breakfast. Who doesn’t love a warm tortilla oozing with cheese, eggs, sausage, and vegetables? If you’d like to go vegetarian, substitute the sausage for cooked sweet potatoes (just make sure they are diced very small so they cook evenly).

Make in Advance Method: Freezer (about 2 months) or Fridge (3-4 days).

Make Ahead Freezer Bacon Egg Cheese Biscuits

Egg and Cheese Biscuits: Out of all the options in this post, making egg and cheese biscuits requires the most hands-on time in the kitchen. For this reason, egg and cheese biscuits are considered a special weekend breakfast in our house. Anytime egg and cheese biscuits are on the menu, I plan to serve them for breakfast that morning and freeze the extras for later.

Make in Advance Method: Freezer (about 2 months) or Fridge (3-4 days).

Make-Ahead Grab-n-Go Omelet Cups

Mini Quiche or Omelet Cups: These are so easy to make. Omelet cups can be customized according to your family’s likes and dislikes. For another variation make mini-quiche with seasonal veggies: Easy Spring Vegetable Mini Quiche. If you can’t find asparagus right now try sautéed spinach or peppers.

Make in Advance Method: Freezer (about 2 months) or Fridge (3-4 days).

5 ways to prepare eggs in advance. Make your prep day count and prep those eggs. #5 is my favorite way.

Good Ol’ Hardboiled Eggs: Probably the most boring option on this list, but let’s not discredit the good ol’ hardboiled egg. Hardboiled eggs require 10 minutes of prep time and can be used as a quick breakfast or snack (my son loves to pull a hardboiled egg from the fridge in the morning) or chopped in a weeknight salad. I recommend peeling hardboiled eggs before storing them in the fridge for future use.

To boil the perfect hardboiled egg: Place the desired number of eggs in a medium-size pot. Pour water over the eggs, just until the eggs are covered. Add 1 teaspoon of salt (this helps with the peeling, particularly when using fresh farm eggs) and cover the pot with a lid. Bring the water and eggs to a boil. Once boiling, turn off the heat and allow the eggs to rest (with the lid on!) for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes run the eggs under cool water and peel.

Make in Advance Method: Fridge (1 week). Do not freeze.

Easy Bacon Deviled Eggs: Only 6 ingredients are required to make the BEST deviled eggs!

Deviled Eggs: Besides egg burritos, deviled eggs are my absolute favorite way to prep eggs in advance. Side Note: How many times can I say “eggs” in one sentence? My recipe for deviled eggs includes bacon and herbs–yep, it’s like a party in your mouth!

Make in Advance Method: Fridge (3-4 days). Do not freeze.

5 ways to prepare eggs in advance. Make your prep day count and prep those eggs. #5 is my favorite way.

This week, your homework is to create a meal plan, go shopping for the food you’ll need to implement the meal plan, set aside a specific day/time for prep time, and then print and fill out the Prep Day Action Plan printable. Focus on five foods you can prep this week based on your meal plan and schedule: making soup, cooking and shredding chicken, washing storing greens, prepping muffins/biscuits/pancakes, making eggs, or blending smoothies, etc.

More Real Food You May Like:

How to make shredded chicken in the crock-pot using a whole chicken

Prep Day: How to Make Easy Crock-Pot Shredded Chicken

How to prep smoothies in advance

Prep Day: 4 Simple Ways to Make Smoothies in Advance

Prep Day 101: The why, what, and how to

Prep Day: Why, What, & How To of Preparing Food in Advance

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16 Comments

  • If you are a multi tasker and lose track of time here is another way to hard boil eggs. Put two cups of water on your rice cooker, add eggs to the steamer basket and steam for 15 minutes. These are perfectly cooked and I can walk away and know they will always be perfect.

  • We are big fans of making hard boiled eggs and breakfast burritos for the week, but I never think to make deviled eggs and they are so good! I’m going to whip up a batch just for me. No pot luck sharing this time!

  • Great list! I’m a big fan of eggs for the reason you mentioned.

    Eggs most often make it onto our dinner plate as frittatas. Every couple of weeks, I’ll realize I’m a little backed up on using my fresh produce. Whatever seems like it would be good together gets chopped up and made into a frittata, with or without bacon or sausage, and usually with feta or Parmesan cheese. I make two at once. One cooks in my cast iron skillet and gets eaten that night, the other goes into a glass pie dish and into the freezer to be cooked another night. Yum!

    Thanks for the great ideas!

    Colley

    • Hey Grace,

      Great idea–I love it! What a great way to maximize your time in the kitchen. I’ve used this make-ahead method with quiche before, but never thought about frittatas. Thank you for sharing!

  • I have a large event coming up where we will need to serve breakfast to 700+ people. I am considering what I can do that will be the most simple and produce the least amount of trash. My thought was bagels with cream cheese or with ham, cheese and egg patty and then have some fruit on the size as well. Can I get your advice on the best way to cook that many eggs? I mean if we think 2 eggs per person? I am thinking cooking them in the oven before hand and slicing them into squares and then freezing? But then what would be best for thawing and warming the morning of? I appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks for the great content!

    • Hey Erin, Wow, that’s a lot of people. I think that’s a great idea. I think either scrambling the eggs in batches (really large skillets), or baking in casserole pans and then slicing (as you mentioned) is the best way to go about this. I would try do everything ahead of time, except cook the eggs that morning.

      • Can you scramble the eggs the night before? I plan putting scrambled eggs in shell type and the frying it. So plan was to scramble the eggs the night before and then next day make the shells, put the eggs and then fry and serve them. Could you do that or scramble the eggs the same day as well?

  • Newbie here with an egg question… how important is it that the eggs are also organic if they are pasture-raised? With a family that eats about 36 eggs a week that $2 a dozen price difference between organic pasture-raised and not could make a big difference in our grocery budget.

    • Hey TJ, Personally, I go for pasture raised eggs over organic. Sometimes, many times, pasture raised eggs are also organic. For us, I prioritize eggs, dairy, and meat over organic produce so that’s where I’m able to make the room in our budget. With that said, you have to do what’s best for you–both what’s available and budget. I would rather see a family eating fresh, real eggs any day over processed breakfast foods.

  • I thought this blog was going to describe how to make eggs for the week, not burritos, biscuits, deviled etc.

    I just want eggs ready to go in the morning. Scrambled or fried. I am not sure which would be best and the best method for preserving them throughout the week without being rubbery. But alas, this blog isn’t how to make eggs in advance, but how to make egg meals in advance.

    • Hey Katie, Sorry this isn’t what you’re looking for. I would store whatever eggs you’re making in a glass storage container in the fridge. Reheating eggs can be tricky. My best advice is to make hardboiled eggs or omelette cups, as both can be served at room temperature and stored in the fridge for 5 days and you’re not going to end up with a rubbery product.

      For scrambled or fried eggs, you can make them in advance and store as recommended above. I would microwave the scrambled eggs, but the fried egg I would eat at room temperature. Also, don’t store anything in a glass container until fully cool.

      Does that help?

      I’m happy to help with any specifics…what else would you like to know?

      • Kristin,

        No worries. Sorry if comment sounded harsh–didn’t mean it. I wasn’t sure if it could be done, so I just googled making eggs in advance to see, and I got excited when I saw your blogging thinking it could be done.

        I found this one, though: https://www.sustainablecooks.com/scrambled-eggs/

        Why a glass container as opposed to what the the above blog says–just airtight container?

        I have no doubt your blog is helpful to many. I just can’t eat wheat or dairy, so i need just eggs. Thanks though.

        • Hey Katie, Any air-tight container will work. I just happen to use glass air-tight containers because I find they work the best and you don’t have any leaching with plastics. You can see how I store all my food and what I consider to be the best of the best containers, here: https://livesimply.me/2019/01/25/real-food-fridge-tour/

          Thanks, glad you found a good answer for what you’re looking for. I appreciate the comment as we’re always looking for ways to improve our reader experience. Also, there’s definitely a way to avoid gluten and dairy in all the recipes above if you’re looking to expand past scrambled eggs. I love Siete tortillas for a gluten free egg burrito and any milk can be substituted with a plant based option. And any cheese can definitely be skipped. Just wanted to throw that out there. I had to go gluten-free and dairy-free for a gut healing protocol for many months and had to find alternatives.

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